Oral Histories

One of the projects of the Mesa Historical Society has been collecting, digitizing, and transcribing oral histories from Mesa residents.medium_dwight patterson resized.jpg

An IMLS grant allowed the Mesa Historical Society to participate in the "A Sound Model" project, and the result is increased access to these historical documents.

Oral history of Orin Fuller
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Fuller gives a bit of family history and tells of his parents' homestead in Mesa where they settled and raised dairy cattle because of the good weather and affordable land. Fuller attended school in Mesa and Gilbert, graduated from Tempe Normal School, and went on a mission to Chicago for the Mormon Church. He recalls playing basketball and going to the Mezona every Saturday to dance. He also remembers seeing President Theodore Roosevelt when he was in the second grade. Fuller tells of marrying Faun Ellsworth in 1932 and hiring Joe Standage to build them a house in which they still live. After teaching school for many years, Fuller reentered the dairy industry.

Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Fuller, Orin -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Dairy farming -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Orin Fuller
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Mr. and Mrs. Larkin Fitch
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: As one of the last farmers to hold farm land inside the city limits of Mesa, Mr. Fitch discusses the difficulties of holding onto his land and farming in the city. He talks about his career as a farmer working with dairy, sheep, cotton, citrus, and hay. The Fitches have been in Mesa since it was a town of about 4000 in 1928, and have lived in the same house on N. Center since 1933. Mr. Fitch talks about how much Mesa has grown, the development of houses and business, and the loss of farm land in the area. He mentions his involvement in Rotary Club, the Masonic Lodge, and his service on the board of the Salt River Project. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Fitch, Larkin -- Interviews
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Farmers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Mr. and Mrs.
Larkin Fitch
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Dave and Helen Duckworth
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Dave Duckworth begins by telling how he and Helen came to Mesa in 1943 so he could work as a pharmacist. He talks about living in the Evergreen district, owning a drugstore with his father, and how medicine has changed in 40 years. He describes what Mesa was like in the 1940's with wide streets, a thriving downtown district, and good schools. Mr. Duckworth talks about the semi-rural environment that allowed people to have horses in their yards in the middle of town. He mentions being a charter member of the Mesa Southside Sheriff's Posse. Helen Duckworth tells that she worked as a nurse for a pediatrician in Mesa and also did bookkeeping for Mr. Duckworth's drugstore. They tell the story of how the Mesa Country Club was started in the early 1950's. The Duckworths reminisce about people they've known for years, and they mention several businesses in the downtown area.

Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Duckworth, Dave -- Interviews
Pharmacists -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Duckworth, Helen -- Interviews
Nurses -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Medicine -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Dave & Helen
Duckworth
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Louetta Freeman
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Freeman tells the story of her families move to Arizona in 1927 in a covered wagon. She talks about her father's experience as a school bus driver driving relatively long distances to pick up kids for school and mentions the homes where her family lived. She recalls that her family had one of the first phones in Mesa and that many people stopped in to borrow it. Freeman describes downtown Mesa and mentions several business including Molly's, J.C. Penney's, Woolworth's, and Everybody's Drugstore. Freeman married James Freeman, had two children, attended Mt. Calvary Baptist Church, and worked as a clerk at Diamond's department store at Tri-City Mall. She discusses race relations in Mesa, where she attended Mesa High School, and recalls that before desegregation students had to go to Phoenix and attend Carver High School or not attend at all. Freeman was the only African American in the school band. She describes an incident where her bandmates walked out of a Phoenix restaurant because she was refused service. She also talks about not being able to swim at the Rendezvous Pool or eat at the counter at Everybody's Drugstore. Freeman concludes by stating her hope that people could love each other more and get along.

Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Freeman, Louetta -- Interviews
Race relations -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
African Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Louetta
Freeman
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lin Werner
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Werner, an important civic leader in Mesa, was born in Harrisonburg, Virginia, in 1901. He came to Mesa in 1925 when the J.C. Penney Company transferred him. Werner talks about his career with Penney's in Mesa and in Burbank, California. He discusses his civic activities in Mesa where he was elected mayor in 1936. He also served on the Chamber of Commerce Board and in Rotary Club. Werner gives detail about the development in Mesa including building parks and recreation venues, improving streets, and promoting Mesa as a great place to live. Werner was also responsible for eliminating the city's property tax. Werner married Eliza Willis in 1926, and he talks about their family. He also recalls planting his citrus grove on Val Vista Drive. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Businessmen -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Mayors -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Werner, Lin -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
J.C. Penney Co. -- History
Park facilities -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Development
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lin Werner
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Iser Tibshraeny
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Oral history talk during which the audience asks questions. Transcript available. Tibshraeny tells of his family's move to Mesa in 1919. They purchased the Crismon home on North Robson, one-half block north of Main Street, where they lived for 30 years. Tibshraeny graduated from Mesa High School in 1927 and recalls that there was only one paved street in Mesa at the time. He mentions several businesses in town including the Toggery, Clark furniture, Orange Blossom, O.S. Stapley's and some grocery stores. He tells the audience that the Mesa Country Club and the first city airport were built on an old city dump. He also recalls that the teenagers danced at the Mezona every Friday night, and Mesa's first hospital was the old LeSueur home at Hibbert and Main streets.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Tibshraeny, Iser -- Interviews
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of an oral history interview
with Iser Tibshraeny
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Dean and Zeta Thayer
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Mr. Thayer tells the story of his parents' trip to Phoenix, from Lima, Ohio, as tourists in 1900. They ended up staying because the town of Buckeye badly needed a physician. The Thayers, who married in 1927, homesteaded in Mesa where they dug a well and cleared 200 acres of cactus and brush to grow citrus. They also milked dairy cows to pay for the land and trees. They ran a nursery and sold citrus trees to other growers. Mrs. Thayer recounts many funny stories of living on the land and the wild things they ate. She tells the story of adopting their two children. Mrs. Thayer also recalls many businesses located in central Mesa such as the Nile Theater, the Waldorf Cafe, and J.C. Penney's. Transcript available.
Subject: Thayer, Dean H. -- Interviews
Thayer, Zeta L. -- Interviews
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Citrus -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Dean and Zeta
Thayer
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Mary Strauch
Side B
Creator: Strauch, Mary
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Strauch begins by telling of her father's journey to Salt Lake City, Utah, where she grew up. She talks about her brother, who was a successful anthropologist. Strauch tells the story of her husband, Don, traveling through the West to find a place to live with good weather. She tells of following him to Mesa, Arizona, where he started a very successful printing and stationery business. Strauch talks about the family business, which later included a gift shop, and how she balanced work and family. She mentions several people that have been longtime friends of hers. She discusses how Mesa has grown since WWII and the effects of the Williams Field and Falcon Field airports on Mesa's development. She recalls her first ride in an open-cockpit biplane.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Strauch, Mary -- Interviews
Businesswomen -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Strauch, Don
Civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Mary Strauch
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Norris and Margaret Steverson
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Mr. Steverson was born in Mesa in 1910 at the corner of Main and Sirrine in the Territory of Arizona, and lived in many different places, including, Yuma, El Paso, Florida and Mexico City, Mexico. He gives his family's background and information about his parents. His father played for the St. Louis Cardinals and a team in El Paso. He worked as an was an engineer on the Roosevelt Dam. Steverson's mother, Laura B. Rogers Steverson Quick, earned a lifetime teaching certificate from Tempe Normal School (now Arizona State University). Her father, Henry Clay Rogers, was leader of a group that had been sent to settle Lehi by Brigham Young. Steverson's grandfather Rogers was part of the OS Stapley Co. with OS Stapley and Joel Clark. They ended up dividing the venture into three parts: Rogers got the land, Clark got the furniture company and OS Stapley got the general store. Steverson graduated from Arizona State College. He talks about his athletic accomplishments which led to his playing professional football and to a long coaching career at ASU in football, rodeo, and other sports. Mrs. Steverson also gives her family's history. Her parents were James LeSueur and Anna Maria Anderson. Her father came to Arizona in 1879, at 8 months old, with a group who had been called on a colonizing mission. The adobe house the family built still stands at East First Avenue and Hibbert. Her grandfather made a lot of money in sheep, and also served as President of the Maricopa Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Ladder-Day Saints. Her father, who was instrumental in getting the Mesa Temple started, bought lot of land and became very wealthy. When the Great Depression came he would not take bankruptcy but worked many years to pay all his debtors. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Athletes -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Businessmen -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Norris and
Margaret Steverson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Ike and Elaine Steele
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Mr. Steele tells of his father moving from Provo, Utah, to Mesa in 1876, where he homesteaded and eventually owned a restaurant. He recalls that his family had livestock including dairy cows and that he attended a two-room schoolhouse in Lehi. Mrs. Steele talks about her schooling and mentions that she took lunch to her father, a constable, everyday. She also describes riding in a horse-pulled buggy to Phoenix to attend the fair.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Steele, Ike -- Interviews
Steele, Elaine -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Ike and Elaine
Steele
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lelah Schornick
Side B
Tape 2 Side A
Tape 2 Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Schornick tells of her family's move to Mesa from Cherryville, Kansas, in 1909, to help her father's bronchiectasis. She recalls crops grown in those days: almonds, peaches, cantaloupe, citrus, dates. There were many ostrich farms and they ate ostrich eggs. She also talks about keeping cool by sleeping outside and wrapping water jars in wet burlap. Schornick married her husband Eugene (Gene), in 1917, and they had two children. Gene fought in World War II and retired from a career at Salt River Project during which he helped install the electrical system at Parker Dam. Schornick talks in length about her extensive collections of Native American art and artifacts including pottery, blankets, and kachinas. She gives detailed history of the art and much information about the daily lives of Native Americans. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Schornick, Lelah -- Interviews
Schornick, Lelah -- Art collections
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Social life and
customs -- 20th century
Indian textile fabrics -- Collectors and collecting
Kachinas -- Collectors and collecting
Indian pottery -- Collectors and collecting
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lelah
Schornick
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Maynard Henry Sargent
Side B
Tape 2 Side A
Tape 2 Side B
Tape 3
Tape 4 Side A
Tape 4 Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Sargent tells of his family's move to Mesa from Kansas via Los Angeles, California. He retired from a career at Salt River Project, but also worked as a farmer. Sargent gives great detail of farming operations, harvesting processes, and irrigation practices in the early and mid 20th century. He discusses various crops and products including dairy, almonds, citrus and grains. He also recalls the locations of many early farms and farmers such as the Longmores, Dobsons, and Stapleys. Sargent talks about attending Mesa High School and what kids did for recreation-- sports, swimming in the canal, 10-cent movies, and plays. He also mentions some home remedies and the chores he has as a boy. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Sargent, Maynard Henry -- Interviews
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Farmers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Recreation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Maynard Henry
Sargent
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Isaac Owen Rogers
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Born in Mesa in 1903, Rogers tells of how his family was sent by Brigham Young to colonize Arizona. His father, Isaac Higby Rogers, worked as a blacksmith and invented a new device to shoe mules. He recalls details of farming with no machinery and home life with no electricity or running water. They used wet burlap to keep milk, eggs and butter cool. Rogers' grandfather was president of the Indian mission of the Mormon church, and Rogers gives a lot of detail about the daily life of Native Americans. Rogers' wife's family came to Mesa in 1907 and originally settled in the Lehi area. They later purchased land in Mesa, where Mr. and Mrs. Rogers still lived at the time of this interview. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Rogers, Isaac Owen -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Indians of North America -- Arizona -- Social life and
customs -- 20th century
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Isaac Owen
Rogers
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Boyd Rogers
Side B
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Rogers tells of his family's move to Mesa in the late 1800s to settle. His grandfather, Chancy Foster Rogers, homesteaded 80 acres at the southwest corner of Alma School Road and University where Rogers was born in 1900. He tells several stories about the Rogers brothers and their homesteading days. Rogers talks about his school days including a time when he fell off the swings and broke both arms. He mentions home remedies and the value of a dollar in those days. He also describes his family's first car-- a 1913 Model T Ford that had three foot peddles, but no accelerator pedal. Rogers and his wife were very active in the Mormon church and he talks about their activities including Sunday school, serving in the Elder's Quorum, and being a temple worker. Transcript available.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Rogers, Boyd -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Boyd Rogers
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Charles Innes Robson and Clara Phelps Robson
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Mr. and Mrs. Robson, along with the interviewer, Charles Mitten, discuss some of the first automobiles in Mesa, Arizona. They reminisce about who owned what car and what the roads were like. They also mention some early residents and buildings in Mesa.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Robson, Charles Innes --Interviews
Robson, Clara Phelps -- Interviews
Automobiles -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Charles Innes
Robson and Clara Phelps Robson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Dolly Beville Robertson
Side B
Creator: Robertson, Dalton (Dolly) Sims Beville
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Robertson begins by recounting her family's move from California to Arizona in 1911. Her father, Paul Baxter Beville, a citrus farmer, moved to Mesa to grow citrus because the land was plentiful and the temperatures were ideal. Robertson recalls that her father became a community leader, serving on the Mesa City Council and as mayor in the mid-1910's. She mentions several prominent Mesa families and local businesses including Everybody's Drugstore, the Toggery, Wendel's jewelry store, Gurley's meat market, the White House hotel, and Gibbon's Mortuary. She talks about the school system when she was a child, including the racially-segregated schools, and names some of her teachers. Robertson talks about some of the churches in town, describes the downtown neighborhood, and gives a detailed accounting of which family lived where.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Robertson, Dalton (Dolly) Sims Beville -- Interviews
Citrus -- Arizona -- Mesa
Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Neighborhood -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Beville, Paul Baxter
Mayors -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Biography
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Dolly Beville
Robertson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lorenzo Dow Rhoton
Side B
Creator: Rhoton, Lorenzo Dow
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Rhoton begins by describing his childhood in Shumway, Arizona, where his parents settled in 1888. He discusses his 51-year career as a teacher in Arizona, 24 of which were in Mesa. He talks about the schools in Mesa, the unification of several small school districts in the area, and names several teachers and principals. He mentions attending the dedication of the Mormon Temple in 1927. Rhoton talks about courting his wife and marrying her in Holbrook, Arizona, in 1917. He also describes the car accident that killed his wife in 1980. Rhoton mentions some businesses in Mesa, talks about his activities in the Mormon Church, and describes some of the changes in transportation he has seen in his life.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Rhoton, Lorenzo Dow -- Interviews
Teachers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lorenzo Rhoton
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with John and Betty Rhodes
Side B
Tape 2
Creator: Rhodes, John J. (John Jacob), 1916-2003 Rhodes, Betty
Harvey
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available This oral history interview was conducted simultaneously on videotape as raw footage. Selections were made for the video presentation. Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes begin by talking about life after John's service in Congress. Mr. Rhodes discusses his military service, beginning three days before Pearl Harbor, during which he was stationed at Williams Air Force Base in Arizona. He talks about starting a law practice in Mesa, Arizona, where he was one of the only Republicans in town. Mr. Rhodes tells about becoming active in politics, starting the Young Republicans group, and agreeing to run for Arizona Attorney General at Barry Goldwater's request. He also talks about some of his earliest campaigns when he ran for Congress and was the first Republican from Arizona elected to the House of Representatives. Mr. Rhodes discusses his service on the Interior Committee, the Appropriations Committee, and his work on getting the Central Arizona Project funded. He relates that his saddest experience in office was telling President Nixon that he would be impeached. The Rhodes talk about their family life including their four children. Mrs. Rhodes recalls her experience of sponsoring and christening a submarine, the U.S.S. Phoenix. Mr. Rhodes discusses his views of current politics -- national and local -- and reminiscing about some colleagues and fellow civic leaders. The Rhodes finish by telling about their 12 grandchildren.
Subject: Rhodes, John J. (John Jacob), 1916-2003 -- Interviews
Legislators -- United States -- Interviews
Civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Central Arizona Project Aqueduct (Ariz.) -- History
United States -- Politics and government -- 1945-1989
Rhodes, Betty Harvey -- Interviews
Women civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Phoenix (Submarine) -- History
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Eva Watson Johnson Quist
Side B
Creator: Quist, Eva Watson Johnson
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Johnson gives an account of her family's move to Arizona in 1925 to benefit her mother's health. Her family settled on 10 acres on Broadway Road, near the Mormon Temple, where they farmed and raised chickens. She talks about her father, Charles Watson, who was a talented actor and singer. She also tells the story of her mother, Irene Watson, starting Watson's Flowers, a longtime family-owned business in Mesa. Quist tells of training as a registered nurse, taking care of her mother before she died, and eventually taking over the family's flower shop business. She talks about the benefits of being a nurse and all the family members she has been able to care for. She briefly discusses the kinds of medicine she had as a child.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Quist, Eva Watson Johnson -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Nurses -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Watson, Irene
Florists -- Arizona -- Mesa
Watson's Flower Shop -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Eva Watson
Johnson Quist
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Wayne and Zoe Phelps
Side B

Tape 2
Creator: Phelps, Wayne Ellsworth Phelps, Mary Zoe Hill
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Wayne Phelps begins by giving his family's history and telling how his grandparents moved to Arizona at the request of Brigham Young. He recalls several early Mesa families and the houses they built. He reminisces about selling newspapers as a young boy, and about a trip he took to the Grand Canyon. He also recalls several local business including the Rex Hotel, Gus Wendel's jewelry store, F.P. Drew Lumber Company, and a few blacksmithing shops. Mr. Phelps talks about his schooling, mentions several of his teachers, and remembers when Franklin School was turned into a hospital during the 1918 flu epidemic. He also tells the story of building the Times Theatre in 1946 and selling it to Mr. Nace in 1951. Zoe Phelps talks about growing up in Mesa where her father was a leader in the Mormon Church and a farmer. She recalls that when she was a young girl her mother was sick quite a bit but still sewed, washed, cooked and made homemade pickles. She tells a story of being rebuked by Bishop Dana for being late to church and that from the experience she learned to respect authority. Mrs. Phelps discusses raising her family, going on church mission trips, and returning to finish college 35 years after starting. She names her children, whom they married, and what they do for a living. She talks about learning to fix hair and working as a beautician.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Phelps, Wayne Ellsworth -- Interviews
Phelps, Mary Zoe Hill -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Wayne and Zoe
Phelps
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

History lecture by Dwight Patterson
Creator: Patterson, Dwight
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Lecture at Mesa Historical Museum; introduction by Tina Rowley. Introduction includes biographical information about Dwight Patterson. He served on the Mesa Parks Board, and as president of several associations including the Mesa Chamber of Commerce, the Mesa School Board, the Maricopa County Community College District, and the Arizona School Board Association. Patterson gives some of his family's history including that his grandfather homesteaded in Arizona in 1888 and his father ran one of Mesa's first telephone companies. Patterson, who farmed in Mesa, gives a brief overview of the history of farming in the area. He describes some of the machinery used in harvesting and baling hay, and talks about the water supply in Arizona. He discusses the future of farming in the area, the price of land, and the government's interference. Patterson responds to several questions from the audience and expresses in pride in the city of Mesa, its city government, its parks system, and its unique history. He tells of his transition from a football coach to a farmer working with sheep and cattle and mentions the numerous pieces of land he's owned. Patterson also talks about the unification of several school districts in Mesa Union, Lehi, Mesa. Alma, and Jordan and attributes that success to Harvey Taylor. Transcript available
Subject: Patterson, Dwight
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Sheep ranches -- Arizona -- History
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Water supply -- Arizona
Civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of lecture by Dwight Patterson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Shirley Palmer
Side B
Creator: Palmer, Shirley Hill
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Palmer begins by telling that she was born in Mesa, Arizona, and has lived there all her life. She describes her schooling and names many of her teachers. She recounts that although her family was poor, she never felt poor. She gives some family history and tells of her grandparents, the Hills and the Stapleys, settling in Mesa. She talks about everyday life including doing laundry, preserving food, and sleeping outside in summer. Palmer tells about dating and marrying her husband, Lehi Palmer, who was active in the Mormon Church and a talented dancer. The Palmers, who farmed for a living, also taught dancing and helped coordinate road shows and workshops for the church.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Palmer, Shirley Hill -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Amusements -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Palmer, Lehi
Farmers -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Shirley Palmer
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

History lecture by Florence Knox Mitten
Creator: Mitten, Florence Knox
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Local history lecture Transcript available Mitten tells of her parents' move to Mesa in November 1900 from Canada. After working briefly as a farmhand, her father became water master on the Utah Canal. Mitten gives great detail about daily life including methods of cooling the house, preserving food, doing laundry, cutting hay, and daily chores involved in rural living. She describes homesteading east of Mesa after marrying Charlie Mitten in 1927. She tells about building a home in 1936 on First Avenue in Mesa and starting Mesa's first daily newspaper, the Mesa Daily Tribune, in 1949. Mitten plays a sound recording of Charles Mitten telling the history of the newspaper and responds to a few questions from the audience.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Mitten, Florence Knox
Mitten, Charles
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Newspapers -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of local history lecture by
Florence Mitten
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lillian Millett
Side B
Tape 2
Creator: Millett, Lillian Freestone
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Millett moved to Mesa from Los Angeles in 1916. She describes the trip that took her family seven days in a Model T. Ford. She describes the big changes from Los Angeles including having no refrigeration or electricity, and being completely dependent on mesquite wood. She also describes using wet burlap to keep things cool. Millet married Williams Howard Millett, a native of Mesa, and they had six children. Howard was in the first group that went to World War I from Arizona. The Milletts were farmers and Howard also worked as a melon inspector. She talks about following the melon harvest through several states. Millett also talks about school life, and common home remedies including chaparral tea. She discusses recreation including community dances at the Mezona, picnics, and Pioneers Days in Phoenix.
Subject: Millett, William Howard
Millett, Lillian Freestone -- Interviews
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Recreation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Medical care -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lillian
Millett
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Zelma Miller
Side B
Creator: Miller, Zelma Mabel Crandall
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Miller tells of her family's move, when she was 14 years old, to the Gilbert area to farm. She describes her schooling, some of the area's fairs and parades, going to the movies, and other things they did for entertainment. She talks about medicine, home remedies, and how her entire family was ill during the flu epidemic of 1918. She recalls that Mesa's streets began to be paved around 1918 and that her father's first car was a ?Grant.? Miller talks about her daily home life and then marrying Joseph Edmund Miller when she was 18 years old. She discusses some of her civic activities, her activities in the Mormon Church, and tells about her husband being the City Manager of Mesa.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Miller, Zelma Mabel Crandall -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Civic leaders -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Gilbert
Amusements -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Miller, Joseph Edmund
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Zelma Miller
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Mesa Leadership talk with Angy Booker, Celia Burns, Susie Sato
Creator: Booker, Angy; Burns, Celia; Sato, Susie Ikeda
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Booker, Burns, and Sato ? all from well-known families who helped settle Mesa participate in a panel interview to talk about Mesa in the early 1900's. They each tell how their families came to Mesa and what they did for a living, including farming and cooking at a downtown armory. They discuss everyday life ? doing laundry by hand, swimming in the canals for recreation, and keeping cool without air-conditioning. Booker talks about being part of the first African-American family to live in Mesa. Sato talks about being Japanese in an area that was primarily Mormon; she also describes the situation she and other Japanese-Americans were in during WWII. They conclude the interview by fielding questions from the audience telling what they like about contemporary Mesa and giving some school-day memories.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Booker, Angy -- Interviews
African Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Sato, Susie Ikeda -- Interviews
Japanese Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Burns, Celia -- Interviews
Race relations -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of Mesa Leadership panel
discussion
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Owen Grant Macdonald
Side B
Creator: Macdonald, Owen Grant
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Macdonald was born in Mesa in 1903. His grandfather was the first mayor of Mesa and also the first president of the Maricopa Stake of the LDS church. MacDonald Drive was named for him. Macdonald worked as the postmaster for 30 years and chief clerk for the City of Mesa for nine years. As a young man he delivered telegrams for Western Union. Macdonald gives great detail about stores and buildings in downtown Mesa including the Toggery, Stapley's, Vance's bakery, A&B grocery, Little American Kitchen, Crescent Drugs, and the Mesa City Bank. He recalls that the first 'hospital' was the old LeSueur home and the Franklin school was used as a hospital during the flu epidemic. He also describes his childhood games, fun, and homemade entertainment. Macdonald also recalls seeing President Roosevelt 1911 when he came to dedicate Roosevelt Dam. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Macdonald, Owen Grant -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Postmasters -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Owen Grant
Macdonald
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Harriet Palmer McCarter
Creator: McCarter, Harriet Palmer
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available McCarter, who was born at Roosevelt Dam, tells of her father coming to Arizona in 1902 and becoming the 43rd registered physician in the state. She mentions that the Historical Museum is publishing a book he wrote about his life in Arizona. McCarter talks about her childhood in Mesa, her schooling, and mentions some of her childhood friends. She discusses some of her father's accomplishments including building Everybody's Drugstore, building the Southside Hospital, and starting the Rotary Club in 1928.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
McCarter, Harriet Palmer -- Interviews
Physicians -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Harriet P.
McCarter
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Martha Louise Libhart
Creator: Libhart, Martha Louise
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Libhart begins by telling the story of her surname. Her grandfather, a recent immigrant, was lost in New York City; when he was found on Libhart Street, that was the name given to him. Libhart moved to Mesa after her parents died and became a music teacher at the Franklin School. She gives a general history of life in Mesa and recalls many parades, going to the movies, and the value of a dollar. She and her husband owned a deli on the corner of Robson and University which they later sold to Don Fuller.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Libhart, Martha Louise -- Interviews
Music teachers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Martha Libhart
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Eddie Lewis
Side B
Tape 2 Side A
Tape 2 Side B
Creator: Lewis, Eddie Charles
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Lewis recounts his grandfather's move from Iowa to Utah and then to Arizona when some leaders of the Mormon Church asked him to help colonize the area. He describes the 60-acre homestead near Main Street and Stapley in Mesa where his grandparents dug a large pond and stock it with fish. He tells many stories about his grandfather, the pond, and the homestead. Lewis recalls buying groceries and how much he could buy with five dollars. He also talks about the Alma School getting its first piano, and going to dances as a young man.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Lewis, Eddie Charles -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Eddie Lewis
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Wanda LeBaron
Side B
Creator: LeBaron, Laura Wanda Hill
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available LeBaron describes her childhood home on Eighth Street one room with a dirt basement and talks about getting water from a well, and keeping a garden and chickens. She talks about her father's work as a farmer and rancher and tells about moving around to live on the various farms he worked. LeBaron discusses her experience teaching in Mesa and her own schooling when she was young. She talks about what the kids did for amusement, what medicine was like as a child, and mentions several downtown businesses in early Mesa. She tells about some her family's church activities, her father's service as a bishop in the LDS Church, and recalls that family morals were very high then. LeBaron tells about marrying Milo Richard LeBaron in 1931 in the LDS Temple and talks about her family, including many members of her extended family.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
LeBaron, Laura Wanda Hill -- Interviews
Teachers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
LeBaron, Milo Richard
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Wanda LeBaron
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Blanche Allen Leavitt
Side B
Creator: Leavitt, Blanche Allen
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Leavitt gives a little family history and mentions that her grandfather, a farmer, was the first person in Mesa to dig a well. She mentions several downtown businesses including the post office, Clyde's furniture store, Dennett's drugstore, LeSueur's grocery store, and The Toggery. She also recalls the Mezona dance hall and the Opera House theater. Leavitt talks about the flu epidemic when her entire family was ill and her uncle died leaving behind a wife and ten children. She recalls when she and her husband, Joe, married and tells a little about his work building Mesa's LDS temple and his career as a Mesa police officer. Leavitt talks about the area surrounding her home on Horne Street, the building of homes and the development of the roads. She describes doing laundry by hand and having milk delivered by a milkman. She finishes the interview by reminiscing about several Mormon families who are all interrelated.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Influenza Epidemic, 1918-1919 -- Arizona -- Mesa
Leavitt, Blanche Allen -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Blanche Allen
Leavitt
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Ray Killian
Side B
Creator: Killian, Ray (Charles Ray), 1896-1989
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Killian recounts his childhood in Concho, Arizona, where his parents owned Concho Mercantile Company. He describes his schooling in Thatcher, Arizona, his successful studies, and the opportunity he was given to train in the banking industry. He talks about his activities in the LDS Church, including a mission to Hawaii, his experiences as a banker during the Great Depression, and his early married life with his wife, Jesse Ellsworth. Killian tells about moving to Mesa in 1935; he describes the town, and names some businesses and prominent citizens. He talks about his service as executive secretary of the Arizona Interstate Stream Commission and gives a great deal of information on the history of the state's water supply including all the work that went into establishing the Central Arizona Project.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Killian, Ray (Charles Ray), 1896-1989 -- Interviews
Arizona Interstate Stream Commission -- Employees --
Interviews
Arizona Interstate Stream Commission -- History
Water supply -- Arizona -- History
Central Arizona Project Aqueduct (Ariz.) -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Ray Killian
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Dr. and Mrs. Lloyd Kent
Side B
Creator: Kent, Melvin Lloyd Kent, Editha Smith
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Dr. Kent discusses his education and how he decided to come to Mesa in 1931 to practice medicine with Dr. Ralph Palmer. He mentions his musical background and how he and Mrs. Kent have supported the Mesa Fine Arts Association. Mrs. Kent describes Mesa when they arrived: a population of 3500, and one square mile bordered by University and Broadway, and Mesa Drive and Country Club Blvd. She describes the downtown area and mentions several businesses including First National Bank, the Rex Hotel, Strauss', Perry's, Milano's, and Wright's shopping center. Mrs. Kent also talks about the difficulties of having no cooling, no water heater, and trying to keep the house clean with so many dust storms. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Kent, Melvin Lloyd -- Interviews
Kent, Editha Smith -- Interviews
Physicians -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Medical care -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Dr. and Mrs.
Lloyd Kent
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Ida Ione Pomeroy Johnson
Side B
Creator: Johnson, Ida Ione Pomeroy
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: A member of the prominent Pomeroy family, Johnson was born in Mesa in 1896, at Robson and Second Ave. Her father was the first Mormon Bishop of Mesa, and one of her distant cousins served as Mesa's mayor in the 1970s. Johnson's father was also a rancher and a dairyman. She recalls driving a wagon to town with her sister to deliver eggs and milk to the local stores. She describes downtown Mesa with its dusty, and sometimes muddy, streets and mentions a few local business including Everybody's drugstore Stapley's hardware store, and the Toggery dry goods store. Johnson gives a timeline of Mesa's population growth from 722 people in 1900 to 140,000 in 1979. She also discusses the role of the Mormons in settling and developing Mesa. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Johnson, Ida Ione Pomeroy -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Agriculture -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mormon Church -- Mesa -- Arizona -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Ida Ione
Pomeroy Johnson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lenna Isley
Side B
Creator: Isley, Lenna Esther
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Isley tells the story of meeting her future husband, Guy Isley, at school and falling in love at first sight. They married and relocated to Arizona from Illinois for his health. She recalls that they moved just after the flu epidemic of 1918. She talks about the first house where they lived, the ranch that Mr. Isley bought with his brother, and how the area has grown. She discusses some church activities and her family, including the business that her son, Guy Roe, started. Isley describes some home remedies and tells some stories about her family's first cars. She also tells about raising dairy cows and making homemade soap. Isley finishes by discussing her late husband's health and her grandchildren.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Isley, Lenna Esther -- Interviews
Isley, Guy
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Dairy farming -- Arizona -- Mesa
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lenna Isley
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with John Lovell Hibbert
Side B
Creator: Hibbert, John Lovell
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Hibbert was born in Mesa at corner of Morris and Second Avenue and married Ruth Hansen in 1932 at the Arizona Temple. He describes what Mesa was like growing up with no running water, no electricity, and dusty streets. He talks about his siblings and his parents who were very active in the Mormon church. Hibbert discusses his education and mentions his graduation from Mesa High School in 1922. He names every person in his graduating class. He recalls going to Phoenix for a parade when Arizona became a state, and his first ride in a car owned by O.S. Stapley. Hibbert remembers watching long mule trains pull wagons and later Pierce Arrow trucks taking equipment and materials to build Roosevelt Dam. He also remembers being present for Theodore Roosevelt's speech on steps of Mesa High School when Roosevelt came to Arizona to dedicate the dam. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Hibbert, John Lovell -- Interviews
Theodore Roosevelt Dam (Ariz.) -- History
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with John Lovell
Hibbert
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Walter Haws
Side B
Creator: Haws, Walter Porfirio
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Haws begins by telling his story of being born in Mexico on the national holiday and being given the middle name Profirio, after Mexican President, Porfirio Diaz. He tells about working in the mines in Globe, Arizona, marrying his wife, and moving to Mesa to ranch with his brother. Haws discusses losing his cotton farm and becoming a truancy officer to make a living a job that he had for 37 years. He describes the area surrounding his first house near Southern Avenue and Mesa Drive and how much it has changed. He also talks about the downtown area and mentions several businesses including the Nile Theatre, Wright's grocery store, the Toggery, and Everybody's drugstore. Haws describes the local railroad lines and where they ran between the towns. He recalls the first cars in town and the first time he saw an airplane. Haws also tells a few stories from his days as a truancy officer.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Haws, Walter Porfirio -- Interviews
Attendance officers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Railroads -- Arizona -- Maricopa County -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Walter Haws
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Pedro Guerrero

Creator: Guerrero, Pedro W.
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Mr. Guerrero came to Mesa in 1914 at the age of 18, and has lived at 37 N. Mesa Drive for 65 years. He describes the area surrounding his home, the streets, and the evolution of transportation in Mesa. He recalls the Stanley Steamer automobile owned by Mr. Spillsbury, the co-owner of LeSueur-Spillsbury Department Store, where Mr. Guerrero worked at one time. Because Mr. Guerrero could speak English, Spanish and the Indian dialect, he was hired to help Mr. Fred Bracket in the A&B Grocery Store. He mentions Franklin School and remembers that the foundation for the school was being laid when he arrived in Mesa. Later, Franklin school was used as a hospital during the 1918 influenza epidemic. He also mentions that his father-in-law, Gumercindo Castro, was one of the wagon team freighters for the Roosevelt Dam construction. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Guerrero, Pedro W. -- Interviews
Transportation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mexican Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Neighborhood -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Pedro Guerrero
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lucille Peterson Hanson
Side B
Creator: Hanson, Lucille Peterson Riggs
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Hanson begins by telling the story of her parents' move to Mesa at the request of Brigham Young; they were asked to help colonize the area. Her father, Hyrum Smith Peterson, served as the Town Marshall of Mesa, but was killed while serving in office. She talks about becoming a teacher and marrying Thomas Franklin Riggs, a blacksmith. Hanson discusses plays, parks, dances, and other things residents of Mesa had for entertainment. She describes dealing with the hot weather, medicine, and other challenges of daily life. She also recalls when President Theodore Roosevelt visited when Roosevelt Dam was dedicated. Hanson tells the story of her first husband's death, being a widow, and then marrying Brother Hanson. She talks about her family and how proud she is that they are all active in the Mormon Church.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Hanson, Lucille Peterson Riggs -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Amusements -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Peterson, Hyrum Smith
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lucille
Peterson Hanson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Owen Gray
Side B
Creator: Gray, Owen
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Gray tells the story of his family's move to Arizona in 1880 after being asked to help settle the area by the prophet of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He jokes about having been related to most of Mesa's residents when he was young. Gray describes early Mesa with its wide, muddy streets, horses and wagons, and lots of people coming to shop on Saturdays and Sundays. He mentions many downtown businesses including McDowell's service station, the Rex Hotel, the F.P. Drew Lumber Company, Riggs' blacksmith shop, and E.D. Macdonald's used car lot. Gray talks about being trained to fix tires and being one of the highest-paid service station attendants working for P.R. McDowell. He also talks about the volunteer fire department, keeping food cool without refrigerators, and drinking chaparral tea to ward off illness. Gray finishes the interview by talking about his family and telling what each of his six children does for a living.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Gray, Owen -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Mesa
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Owen Gray
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Elizabeth Moody Crandall Gale
Side B

Creator: Gale, Elizabeth Moody Crandall
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Gale gives some of her family's history and tells how her father, Francis Winfred Moody, helped settle and design the town of Thatcher, Arizona. She talks about her early life in Thatcher taking care of her siblings and grandmother. After marrying Myron Hamilton Crandall, Gale moved to Gilbert in 1917 where they farmed for several years, raised a family of five boys, and were active in the Mormon Church. Gale describes life in Gilbert and Mesa including going to movies at the Nile Theatre and dances at the Mezona. She talks about some of the hardships of doing laundry, dealing with hot weather, making clothes and making a living. She also mentions the tragedy of her first son dying. Gale talks a little about her grandparents coming over from England after joining the Mormon Church. She describes what a funeral was like when her grandfather, a Mormon bishop, died when she was a young girl.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Gale, Elizabeth Moody Crandall -- Interviews
Thatcher (Ariz.) -- History
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Elizabeth
Moody Crandall Gale
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Beulah Gibson
Creator: Gibson, Beulah
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Gibson recounts her childhood in Mesa where her family settled in the late 1800s. She was born and lived at 42 S. Center where the first Mormon Church is now. Mrs. Gibson had diphtheria as a child and the whole family was quarantined. Later her older sister died of typhoid and it was discovered that their well had been contaminated from their outhouse. Gibson talks about her father being very active in the Mormon church and in politics. She remembers that her family went to Phoenix on the train for the ceremony when Arizona became a state. Gibson's grandfather, Francis Martin Pomeroy, helped lay out the streets of Mesa patterned after the wide streets of Salt Lake City. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Gibson, Beulah -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Pomeroy, Francis Martin
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Beulah Gibson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Faun Ellsworth Fuller
Side B
Creator: Fuller, Faun Ellsworth
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Born in Mesa, Fuller recalls many details of everyday life: children's activities, schools, stores, and economics. She mentions several places people went for recreation including the swimming pool, the state fair, and the opera house. Her mother was a seamstress and her father owned a mercantile store that operated like a trading post for Indians. Fuller's father also served on the city council at one time. She remembers the first Catholic church, the first car of the Stapley family and having the LeSuer family as neighbors. Her father died in 1916 following a difficult surgery and life was very difficult for them after that. She talks some about medical care during that time. Fuller also discusses her schooling and participation in sports, and recalls that she enjoyed close relationships with her teachers. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Fuller, Faun Ellsworth -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Medical care -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Merchants -- Arizona -- Mesa
Recreation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Faun Fuller
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Clara Emmett
Side B
Creator: Emmett, Clara Octavia
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Emmett begins by telling how she and her husband moved from Wyoming to Mesa, Arizona, where they have lived in the same house since 1930. She discusses her volunteer work running the school cafeteria during the Depression, and helping the local Mormon Church start a welfare program. Emmett tells of losing all three of her children and two grandchildren. She describes the development of the streets and sewer systems in early Mesa, and the work she and her husband did on their house. She also mentions several business in downtown Mesa including Sander's, Hamilton's, the Toggery, Mrs. Robinson's restaurant, First National Bank, and Everybody's drugstore. She talks about her first car a Ford sedan and having to drive to Phoenix for many services. Emmett describes everyday life keeping cool, storing food, ironing clothes, and cooking on a woodstove. She finishes by talking about how much she likes Mesa, and telling more about her volunteer work.
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Emmett, Clara Octavia -- Interviews
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Volunteers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Clara Emmett
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Gertrude Cooper
Side B
Creator: Cooper, Gertrude Brookins Mortensen
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Transcript available Cooper tells about her father coming to Arizona in 1908 where he homesteaded in the area of Guadalupe and Greenfield roads in Gilbert. She describes everyday life, hauling water, preserving and storing food, farming, riding horses, and getting around on dirt roads. She talks about marrying Delbert Mortensen who worked as an electrician and then eventually farmed her parents' homestead. Cooper also tells the story of gathering up children in Gilbert to start the first school. She mentions the Mezona, the Rendezvous Hall, parks, and a local baseball team called the Mesa Jewels. She also describes getting her first machine perm and ironing clothes with an old sat iron.
Subject: Gilbert (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th
century
Gilbert (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Cooper, Gertrude Brookins Mortensen -- Interviews
Frontier and pioneer life -- Arizona -- Gilbert
Schools -- Arizona -- Gilbert -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Gertrude
Cooper
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Ms. Veora Johnson
Tape 2
Creator: Johnson, Veora
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Johnson details her education in Texas and tells of her move to Mesa, Arizona, to teach public school. She discusses the history of the Mesa school system during segregation and after. She describes when the schools were integrated and what it was like being the first African American teacher at the Irving School. Johnson also gives some history of the Washington area and talks about race relations in Mesa. Transcript available
Subject: Johnson, Veora -- Interviews
African Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
African American women school principals -- Arizona -- Mesa
-- Interviews
African American women teachers -- Arizona -- Mesa --
Interviews
Public schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Race relations
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Veora Johnson
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Mr. Dolores Perez
Tape 2
Creator: Perez, Dolores, 1929-
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Perez tells about his family emigrating from Mexico to Mesa, Arizona, in 1920, where they homesteaded. He discusses his siblings, the house on North Morris Street where he grew up, and attending Sacred Heart Catholic Church. He describes downtown Mesa where his father opened a shoemaking shop on Main Street. Perez mentions several downtown businesses including the Nile Theater, The Oasis (lunch counter), and some retail stores. He talks about attending Mesa schools, working in his father's shoe shop, and going to California to pick grapes in the summer. He tells how he met his wife, where they lived, and he talks about his son, daughter, and three grandchildren. Perez discusses race relations between blacks, whites, and Mexicans, and the discrimination faced by Japanese residents during World War II. He also talks about how he loves living in Mesa and about how happy his family makes him. Transcript available
Subject: Perez, Dolores, 1929- -- Interviews
Mexican Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Shoemakers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Catholics -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Mr. Dolores
Perez
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Lupe Daniel
Tape 2
Creator: Daniel, Lupe
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Lupe Daniel, a lifelong resident of Mesa, Arizona, talks about spending time as a young boy with Ms. Alma Blew who served as a missionary at the Mexican Methodist Church. He describes Ms. Blew's physical appearance and disposition, and tells of the ways she helped his family and many people in the community. He also gives some description of the neighborhood and buildings surrounding the church building. Daniel talks about growing up in Mesa and attending school; he gives descriptions of the buildings as well as the "shack" he lived in as a young child. He mentions local businesses, the public swimming pools, and the relations between ethnic groups. He discusses the changes in the community that have come about as a result of growth. Transcript available
Subject: Daniel, Lupe -- Interviews
Mexican Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Veterans -- United States -- Interviews
Blew, Alma
Missionaries -- Arizona -- Mesa
Mexican Methodist Church (Mesa, Ariz.)
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Lupe Daniel
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Angy Booker
Tape 2
Tape 3
Creator: Booker, Angy
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Booker, born in Naco, Arizona, talks about her family's history and her experiences as an African American woman in early Mesa. Her great-grand parents were slaves, and her grandfather and father were Buffalo Soldiers in the army. Her mother did laundry for a living, including for the O.S. Stapley family. She describes early downtown Mesa and mentions some businesses such as Everybody's Drugstore, the post office, J.C. Penney's, the hospital, and some churches. Booker discusses race relations in Mesa and some of the African American families who settled in Mesa. She recalls that the first church service for African Americans was held in her front yard. She talks about her schooling and teaching herself to read and write. Booker tells about her first job doing laundry for a Caucasian family and that she almost wasn't paid for her work. Transcript available
Subject: Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
African Americans -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Interviews
Booker, Angy -- Interviews
Race relations -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Central business districts -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Angy Booker
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Ralph Openshaw
Creator: Openshaw, Ralph Arthur
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Openshaw gives an account of life in Mesa, Arizona, where his family moved in 1902. Openshaw was one of the founders of the United Dairymen of Arizona, which helped establish the dairy industry in Arizona. He mentions some of the local businesses, and talks about recreation and the value of a dollar in earlier times. He also describes transportation and freight operations in Mesa in the early 20th century. Transcript available
Subject: Dairy farmers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Biography
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Recreation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Transportation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Biography
United Dairymen of Arizona -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Ralph Openshaw
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use or distribution of these materials must be approved by the Mesa Historical Society. All rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Mason W. Davis
Side B
Creator: Davis, Mason W.
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Davis describes his childhood in Mesa, Arizona, where his family settled in the late 1800s. He discusses his schooling and recalls several businesses in downtown Mesa. Transcript available
Subject: Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Mormons -- Arizona -- Mesa
Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Business enterprises -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Mason Davis
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.

Oral history interview with Marjorie Entz
Side B
Creator: Entz, Marjorie
Resource Type: sound
Date Digital: 2006-03
Description: Entz, born in Illinois, came to Mesa, Arizona, at the age of four to recover from pneumonia. She describes life in Mesa including the transition from horse and buggy to car. She recalls early downtown businesses and describes recreation including dances at the Mezona. She talks about her career as a teacher and the history of Mesa schools. Transcript available
Subject: Teachers -- Arizona -- Mesa -- Biography
Schools -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Mesa (Ariz.) -- Social life and customs -- 20th century
Mesa (Ariz.) -- History -- 20th century
Recreation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Transportation -- Arizona -- Mesa -- History
Source: Audiocassette recording of interview with Marjorie Entz
Language: eng
Rights Management: Use of this oral history is granted for non-commercial and educational purposes only, with the credit line "Courtesy of the Arizona Museum of Natural History." No resale use may be made of this material. All other rights reserved.